Suburban Thoughts
Family, art, architecture, music, and some random thoughts. All from the Jersey coming from the Jersey suburbs.
Suburban Thoughts
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This is how I end a busy Easter. #watergameonlock
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Bros
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midcenturymodernfreak:

Pekka & Minna’s Residence | Espoo, Finland
Follow this couple’s adventures in renovating and furnishing their 1960s mid-century style home. Here is their blog.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Pekka & Minna’s Residence | Espoo, Finland
Follow this couple’s adventures in renovating and furnishing their 1960s mid-century style home. Here is their blog.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Pekka & Minna’s Residence | Espoo, Finland
Follow this couple’s adventures in renovating and furnishing their 1960s mid-century style home. Here is their blog.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Pekka & Minna’s Residence | Espoo, Finland
Follow this couple’s adventures in renovating and furnishing their 1960s mid-century style home. Here is their blog.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Pekka & Minna’s Residence | Espoo, Finland
Follow this couple’s adventures in renovating and furnishing their 1960s mid-century style home. Here is their blog.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Pekka & Minna’s Residence | Espoo, Finland
Follow this couple’s adventures in renovating and furnishing their 1960s mid-century style home. Here is their blog.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Pekka & Minna’s Residence | Espoo, Finland
Follow this couple’s adventures in renovating and furnishing their 1960s mid-century style home. Here is their blog.
Via
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midcenturymodernfreak:

Harley Earl’s Office, Head of Design at General Motors until 1958 | Design: Eero Saarinen - Via
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subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - John Deere Headquarters, Moline IL 1966. Via, 2, photos (C) Balthazar Korab.
subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - John Deere Headquarters, Moline IL 1966. Via, 2, photos (C) Balthazar Korab.
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wandrlust:

Bell Labs, Eero Saarinen, Holmdel, New Jersey, 1962 — Ezra Stoller
wandrlust:

Bell Labs, Eero Saarinen, Holmdel, New Jersey, 1962 — Ezra Stoller
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subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - Miller house, Columbus IN 1953. Via. 
subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - Miller house, Columbus IN 1953. Via. 
subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - Miller house, Columbus IN 1953. Via. 
subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - Miller house, Columbus IN 1953. Via. 
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whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
whatdoistanford:

MIT
absolutely gorgeous holy…
*Note: I don’t own the rights to any of these pictures!
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cabbagerose:

simmons hall, MIT/steven holl
via: yarazitronenblatt
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thechemistryset:

Baker House, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Alvar Aalto, 1947-1948.)
thechemistryset:

Baker House, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Alvar Aalto, 1947-1948.)
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architectura:

MIT Soft Rocker - Solar Powered Sun Lounger
architectura:

MIT Soft Rocker - Solar Powered Sun Lounger
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justbmarks:

Weill Hall, Cornell University by Richard Meier Source: treskro3 (reddit)
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cjwho:

Chapel of St. Ignatius, Seattle, WA by Ervin Vice

'Steven Holl's work has always been marked by a dynamic modesty, an apparent simplicity around which an agenda of space, proportion and language is intensively explored. His current proposal for the 600 sq m Jesuit Chapel of St. Ignatius starts from a well-mannered premise as to site and perimeter condition, then springs into architectural life as interior volumes rise up to catch the natural light and emit, on winter evenings, a carefully calibrated glow. Holl's roofscape of zinc-clad vessels should prove to be an unusually articulate symbol of spiritual purpose'. 
-Raymund Ryan, The Architectural Review

CJWHO:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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vvvision:

Steven Holl
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instagram:

Frank Gehry & Vlado Milunić’s Dancing House (Tančící Dům)

If you ever visit Prague, the famous Nationale-Nederlanden building, nicknamed Dancing House (Tančící dům) or “Fred and Ginger,” is hard to miss. It sits in the middle of a densely built section of Prague, surrounded by other structures that are nearly all the city’s standard Baroque or Art Nouveau styles.

It was designed by Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić and Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot of great historical significance. Its site was the location of a house that was destroyed by the U.S. bombing of Prague in 1945 during World War II. The plot and structure lay decrepit until 1960 when the area was cleared.

The building’s deconstructivist dancing shape is supported by 99 concrete panels, each a different shape and dimension. On the top of the building is a large twisted structure of metal nicknamed Medusa. To see more photos of the quirky architectural marvel, visit the Tančící dům | Dancing House location page.
instagram:

Frank Gehry & Vlado Milunić’s Dancing House (Tančící Dům)

If you ever visit Prague, the famous Nationale-Nederlanden building, nicknamed Dancing House (Tančící dům) or “Fred and Ginger,” is hard to miss. It sits in the middle of a densely built section of Prague, surrounded by other structures that are nearly all the city’s standard Baroque or Art Nouveau styles.

It was designed by Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić and Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot of great historical significance. Its site was the location of a house that was destroyed by the U.S. bombing of Prague in 1945 during World War II. The plot and structure lay decrepit until 1960 when the area was cleared.

The building’s deconstructivist dancing shape is supported by 99 concrete panels, each a different shape and dimension. On the top of the building is a large twisted structure of metal nicknamed Medusa. To see more photos of the quirky architectural marvel, visit the Tančící dům | Dancing House location page.
instagram:

Frank Gehry & Vlado Milunić’s Dancing House (Tančící Dům)

If you ever visit Prague, the famous Nationale-Nederlanden building, nicknamed Dancing House (Tančící dům) or “Fred and Ginger,” is hard to miss. It sits in the middle of a densely built section of Prague, surrounded by other structures that are nearly all the city’s standard Baroque or Art Nouveau styles.

It was designed by Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić and Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot of great historical significance. Its site was the location of a house that was destroyed by the U.S. bombing of Prague in 1945 during World War II. The plot and structure lay decrepit until 1960 when the area was cleared.

The building’s deconstructivist dancing shape is supported by 99 concrete panels, each a different shape and dimension. On the top of the building is a large twisted structure of metal nicknamed Medusa. To see more photos of the quirky architectural marvel, visit the Tančící dům | Dancing House location page.
instagram:

Frank Gehry & Vlado Milunić’s Dancing House (Tančící Dům)

If you ever visit Prague, the famous Nationale-Nederlanden building, nicknamed Dancing House (Tančící dům) or “Fred and Ginger,” is hard to miss. It sits in the middle of a densely built section of Prague, surrounded by other structures that are nearly all the city’s standard Baroque or Art Nouveau styles.

It was designed by Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić and Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot of great historical significance. Its site was the location of a house that was destroyed by the U.S. bombing of Prague in 1945 during World War II. The plot and structure lay decrepit until 1960 when the area was cleared.

The building’s deconstructivist dancing shape is supported by 99 concrete panels, each a different shape and dimension. On the top of the building is a large twisted structure of metal nicknamed Medusa. To see more photos of the quirky architectural marvel, visit the Tančící dům | Dancing House location page.
instagram:

Frank Gehry & Vlado Milunić’s Dancing House (Tančící Dům)

If you ever visit Prague, the famous Nationale-Nederlanden building, nicknamed Dancing House (Tančící dům) or “Fred and Ginger,” is hard to miss. It sits in the middle of a densely built section of Prague, surrounded by other structures that are nearly all the city’s standard Baroque or Art Nouveau styles.

It was designed by Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić and Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot of great historical significance. Its site was the location of a house that was destroyed by the U.S. bombing of Prague in 1945 during World War II. The plot and structure lay decrepit until 1960 when the area was cleared.

The building’s deconstructivist dancing shape is supported by 99 concrete panels, each a different shape and dimension. On the top of the building is a large twisted structure of metal nicknamed Medusa. To see more photos of the quirky architectural marvel, visit the Tančící dům | Dancing House location page.
instagram:

Frank Gehry & Vlado Milunić’s Dancing House (Tančící Dům)

If you ever visit Prague, the famous Nationale-Nederlanden building, nicknamed Dancing House (Tančící dům) or “Fred and Ginger,” is hard to miss. It sits in the middle of a densely built section of Prague, surrounded by other structures that are nearly all the city’s standard Baroque or Art Nouveau styles.

It was designed by Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić and Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot of great historical significance. Its site was the location of a house that was destroyed by the U.S. bombing of Prague in 1945 during World War II. The plot and structure lay decrepit until 1960 when the area was cleared.

The building’s deconstructivist dancing shape is supported by 99 concrete panels, each a different shape and dimension. On the top of the building is a large twisted structure of metal nicknamed Medusa. To see more photos of the quirky architectural marvel, visit the Tančící dům | Dancing House location page.